How Nanotechnology can Help in the Treatment of Infectious Diseases?

Long-term care for conditions such as HIV, tuberculosis, or malaria can place a significant burden on patients and healthcare systems. HIV would necessitate lifelong treatment, whereas tuberculosis would necessitate a combination of oral medications administered over several months to years.

Fremont, CA: Nanomedicine employs nanoscale technology for medical applications, which may include the use of particles ranging in size from 1 to 100 nm. In recent years, the novel use of nanotechnology in medicine has become an exciting development, with innovative Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved concepts that can revolutionize disease detection and treatment.

Infections are a significant burden throughout the world, with high mortality rates associated with conditions such as lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, diarrhea, malaria, HIV, and others. These infectious diseases have a greater impact in the developing world, where mortality rates related to these conditions are the highest due to a scarcity of vaccines and anti-infectives.

Observations from temporal trends in mortality show that, while overall mortality rates are decreasing, there is still a large disparity in death rates between high and low socio-demographic index (SDI) countries. Furthermore, clinical trials for infectious diseases are lesser than trials for other disorders such as cardiovascular disease and even cancer, demonstrating the need for advanced infectious disease treatment through nanotechnology.

Low SID Challenges

Low socio-demographic index countries frequently face a slew of challenges. This includes patients who do not adhere to therapies, the need for ongoing patient monitoring, and other factors such as the inability to pay for drugs or maintaining drug stability in high or humid temperatures.

These factors can make it difficult for low-income countries to effectively treat patients with infections, ranging from hospitals being unable to adequately support their patients to patients being unable to access drugs.

Long-term care for conditions such as HIV, tuberculosis, or malaria can place a significant burden on patients and healthcare systems. HIV would necessitate lifelong treatment, whereas tuberculosis would necessitate a combination of oral medications administered over several months to years. Prolonged treatment plans can lead to a lack of patient adherence, reducing treatment efficacy and resulting in failure because of a lack of optimal drug levels.

Overcoming Challenges Through Nanotechnology

Because of the disparity in hygiene, oral administration of drugs is preferred in low SDI countries. It would be difficult for researchers to develop a drug within a nanocarrier with greater targeting ability and high efficacy, even with oral administration. Furthermore, pharmaceutical development would need to be cost-effective in order for this novel field to be established, as well as have economic and social benefits for countries.

Nanotechnology has the potential to provide revolutionary solutions in medicine and infectious disease treatment. It can help reduce mortality rates, especially in low SDI areas like Africa, where 90 percent of all malaria cases and deaths occur. In low SDI countries, the disparity of infectious diseases is heavily burdened, so sophisticated nanotechnology improvements to treatments will decrease mortality rates and global disease cases. This would benefit developed countries by improving patient care and reducing the amount of aid required by developing countries for infectious disease support.