Bodyport Bags $11.2M in Series A Round of Financing

Bodyport Bags $11.2M in Series A Round of Financing

The company aims to use the new cash to deepen key health partnerships and launch a virtual cardiac clinic that brings intelligent interventions to its remote monitoring technology

FREMONT, CA: Bodyport, a San Francisco, CA-based digital health company focused on the detection and management of heart disease, secured an $11.2m Series A funding round.

The company has raised a total amount of $15.8m to date. The latest round was led by Boehringer Ingelheim Venture Fund with active participation from existing investors Playground Global and Initialized Capital, among others. Boehringer Ingelheim Venture Fund's Dr. Debbie Lin, Playground Global's Bruce Leak, and Initialized Capital's Garry Tan are expected to join the board of directors.

The company aims to use the new cash to deepen key health partnerships and launch a virtual cardiac clinic that brings intelligent interventions to its remote monitoring technology.

Co-founded by biomedical engineers Sarah Smith and Corey Centen, Bodyport develops a novel biomarker platform that detects early warnings of cardiovascular disease, incorporating proprietary sensor technology into a bathroom scale form factor. Instead of depending on wearables, the Bodyport Scale is designed to detect cardiac signals and biomarkers through a user's feet, powering algorithms that are capable of predicting risk and enable optimized, early interventions. The company is focused on improving the management of heart failure. Bodyport also declared a collaboration with Brigham and Women's Hospital focused on furthering technology to prevent avoidable hospitalizations and to help discover and develop novel diagnostic biomarkers for the early detection of cardiovascular disease.

"Despite the fact that cardiovascular disease is largely preventable, it remains the leading global cause of death," stated Bodyport co-founder and CEO Corey Centen. "We're focused on changing the way patients and care teams manage heart disease. By shifting the technology patients can access from a clinical setting to their own home, we are aiming to predict changes in health status before a hospital visit becomes necessary. Ultimately, this early detection could help push care delivery away from its reactive model, reducing costs and drastically improving the quality of life for patients dealing with chronic disease."