IoT Is Enabling the Telemedicine of Tomorrow

IoT Is Enabling the Telemedicine of Tomorrow

In terms of telemedicine, drug delivery services can improve medication adherence among the elderly and other demographic groups. Pillsy, a smart medication bottle that connects to an app, is one choice.

Fremont, CA: Telemedicine is becoming more common as a way to provide healthcare remotely. There are many ways that the Internet of Things is improving telemedicine, allowing providers to deliver care that is potentially better than many in-person treatment options.

Helping Seniors Age in Place

Many seniors, understandably, choose to age in place rather than move into assisted living facilities. Aging in place and remaining healthy necessitates being mindful of available tools, which include everything from neighborhood social networks to meal delivery services. IoT and telemedicine, on the other hand, are expected to play a role in encouraging seniors to make the most of their golden years.

Many home appliances have sensors that appeal to the elderly, making the aging process smoother and less stressful. Individuals can use voice-activated smart speakers to turn on lights or change thermostats, for example. Speech-enabled eCommerce systems can also be used to place orders, enabling consumers to avoid going to the store or running out of products.

In terms of telemedicine, drug delivery services can improve medication adherence among the elderly and other demographic groups. Pillsy, a smart medication bottle that connects to an app, is one choice. It advises patients to take their medications, warns them against double-dosing, and has a sharing feature that alerts loved ones if the patient fails to take their pills as prescribed.

Providing data from medical devices to doctors

One of the well-known challenges of telemedicine is that, while doctors may examine a rash on someone's skin or note pale, sweaty skin through telemedical systems, they cannot always listen to someone's heart or take their blood pressure. If doctors are confident in their patients' abilities, they will ask them to test their pulse rates at home if they have blood pressure cuffs.

CyberMed aims to combine IoT and telemedicine to enable people to use medical devices designed specifically for the company's patients.

People purchase wireless stethoscopes or pulse oximeters, which may be protected by insurance, and then use them during telemedicine appointments. The collected data is sent to the cloud for the physician's near-instantaneous assessment.